Tagged: student cheating

The Application Of Intelligent Context-Aware Systems To The Detection Of Online Student Cheating

This presentation looked at three different types of student cheating and the types of intelligent context-aware systems that could be used to detect them.

Of interest to visitors to this site, one of the cheating behaviours considered was contract cheating.

The presentation took place at the ICAS 2013, workshop. The slides, hosted on SlideShare account for Thomas Lancaster, are included here.

Cyber-Pseudepigraphy Or Contract Cheating

Here’s an interesting aside from the wider literature relating to student cheating which had totally passed me by until I saw the phrase used in a media report.

The term pseudepigraphy is used within some literacy and linguistic fields to describe a piece of writing where the author is not the person listed. For instance, a lot of ghostwritten celebrity autobiographies could fall within the field of pseudepigraphy.

The term cyber-pseudepigraphy was proposed to largely mean pseudepigraphy which was facilitated using the Internet. Some aspects of contract cheating could overlap with that definition. However, I haven’t seen the term fall into widespread use, or make it much beyond a 2004 paper.

Likewise, the paper mentions the term cyber-plagiarism, but that has also largely fallen out of favour. Most people just use the term plagiarism, which is dominated by what would have been called plagiarism in the past.

The paper itself is useful as it raises some early issues related to contract cheating, from around the same time as the initial body of contract cheating research was being published. In fact, a number of less-specific terms exist also, as the idea of someone writing an assignment for another student dates back for decades, but it would be useful exercise for someone to carry out a literature review looking at this development, and how the terminology has changed across different fields.

About Contract Cheating

The term contract cheating describes the form of academic dishonesty where students get academic work completed on their behalf, which they then submit for academic credit as if they had created it themselves.

Often contract cheating involves the payment of a fee to a third party, who then creates the work for the student.

One example of contract cheating would be a student being set an essay. They would then use an essay mill service to have this piece of work written for them. The student would then hand in the essay for marking as if they had written this for themselves.

Since this was an entirely original piece of work, it is unlikely that this would be detected using standard anti-plagiarism text matching services such as TurnItIn.

About ContractCheating.com

ContractCheating.com is intended to provide an overview of the current research into contract cheating. It is provided on behalf of the originators of the contract cheating phrase, Thomas Lancaster and Robert Clarke.